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from president obama that includes $1.6 trillion in tax increase over ten years. more stimulus spending to boost the economy including home mortgage refinancing and the permanent end to congressional control over the debt ceiling. in return, president obama is offering republicans $400 billion in entitlement cuts over ten years. still to be negotiated. mr. obama also wants emergency unemployment benefits and a temporary payroll tax holiday extended along with the infrastructure spending and mortgage relief, the price tag for the president's stimulus bill could rise to $50 billion or more. after meeting with secretary geithner, speaker boehner said he didn't see any sign of compromise from the white house. >> first despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. and secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. >> eliot: no sooner had boehner finished then
. >> thank you. >> eliot: as i mentioned earlier, president obama met with a second group of ceos to talk about the so-called his co-cliff. among them mary kay henry internationale president of the service employees international union, the seiu, welcome to the program. >> thank you. >> eliot: is this cliff, we prefer to call it a slope on this show, is it being overrated? is there hysteria being created to get a compromise around the wrong issues? >> yes, i completely agree with your discussion that you just had with congressman defazio. this conversation needs to be how increased revenue helps us spur economic recovery by getting americans back to work, and job creation has to be our number one priority. this discussion of cuts to programs that elders count on in our country, we need to get off this table so we can focus on a robust economic recovery once and for all. >> eliot: i'm one that agrees that down the road in the long term, maybe even in the medium term we've got tough issues we got to deal with. >> yes. >> eliot: but right now we have a crisis of job creation. it's a growth c
forces? >> i think the obama administration needs to make a big decision. do you confer recognition on national council as legitimate authority of the syrian people. the reason for doing this, they need to push assad out as quickly as possible. he's holding on, and if something doesn't change in this equilibrium he may hold on for months on end. this war could spread in lebanon, jordan, iraq, that's not in the interest of the united states. they need to reinforce this coalition. that's one reason. the other is one of self interest. it's likely that at some point assad is going to fall. this particular group or some element of it will take over as the government of syria. we should want to have influence there given the importance of syria, and the importance of syria to iran. because if we can separate a new syrian government from the iranians that would be a major strategic advantage to the united states. >> eliot: michael, it certainly does seem that the trendline is not favorable to assad, that's good news. but is this another instance where we've been leading from behind, where
freedom. in 2008, president elect obama invited john mccain to his chicago offices and mccain got a meeting. and as for mitt romney, he got a meal. the president treated mr. romney to a lunch of southwestern grilled chicken and, wait for it, white turkey chili. white turkey chili. who knew the white house had such a good sense of humor. gotta go everything, thanks, see you tomorrow. >> eliot: good evening. i'm eliot spitzer. this is "viewpoint." the white house confronted republican leaders today with a new vision of how the country should navigate what we at "viewpoint" prefer to call the fiscal slope or austerity bomb. the white house proposal wasn't well received. treasury secretary timothy geithner met with house speaker john boehner and laid out a detailed list from president obama that includes $1.6 trillion in tax increase over ten years. more stimulus spending to boost the economy including home mortgage refinancing and the permanent end to congressional control over the debt ceiling. in return, pr
been discussion from obama's point of view maybe its easier for them to do that, and make a few deals that looks like you're cutting taxes rather than supporting revenue hikes. >> eliot: we've all been watching the kabuki dance playing out here, and the politics of this that obviously john boehner needs to go to the map and say we will not let marginal rates increase. the president needs to take the opposite perspective but we know the deal is easier to construct as we get closer to december 31st, and they can make the tax changes effective january 31st. and when everything becomes a tax cut rather than maintaining some sort of increase. >> eliot: absolutely. but no one wants to be seen recklessly driving it over the cliff, especially if you see impacts in the economy which i think are less likely, but also if you see impacts in the markets. one of alan greenspan's innovations i would say is that he saw the stock market and the economy as one and the same. if you saw it going down, you had to fix it. what we've seen over the years when there are big problems in washington and unpredic
house. when president obama was in tough straights he went back and did something. i've been fighting this battle for a long time as attorney general, the governor, now for what i believe in. it's time for president obama to stand up to the bullies of the n.r.a. and gun advocates. no more excuses about protecting votes. now is the time to take a tough stand on oh the issues we believe in. marshall your forces, mr. president and bring real change. gun control is necessary and delay means more death and horror. for more on how to make mentionful change on the issue i'm joined by a colorado shooting survivor and now and outreach assistant with the mayor. thank you both for joining us. this issue comes back repeatedly and unfortunately fades into oblivion just as quickly. can you sense in your day to day advocacy, day to day since this horrific day over the weekend what has changed? >> i really believe the momentum is in my favor. people are as fed up as bob costas is with the state of affairs, currently. people want change, and they want to see the president lead when it comes to that ch
of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republicans and democrats can agree on, and i hope we can get back to that point. a lot of work need to be done in the republican party for us to get there. >> eliot: your point is so well taken. there should be no disagreement about extending rights to those with disabilities. this is not a partisan issue. it has not been historically a par
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)